6 Ways Interior Is Advancing America’s Energy Independence

doi logoThe Interior Department is known for protecting some of the most amazing landscapes across the U.S. An equally important part of Interior’s mission is supplying the energy necessary to power America.

Check out some facts about Interior’s role as an energy leader:

1. Interior’s energy history dates back over 100 years. Interior was established to handle domestic matters, and with the creation of the Bureau of Mines in 1910, Interior became responsible for mine safety and minerals technology. Over the years, Interior’s work in energy expanded, and in 1977 several of its functions were spun off to form a new cabinet agency: the Department of Energy.

Acting Secretary Bernhardt Signs Order to Prioritize Implementation of Bipartisan Public Lands Bill

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WASHINGTON – Yesterday, U.S. Acting Secretary of the Interior David Bernhardt signed a secretarial order to establish a Departmental task force to facilitate and prioritize the implementation of S. 47, the John D. Dingell, Jr. Conservation, Management, and Recreation Act (Dingell Act). The bill was made up of more than 100 individual bills that were introduced by 50 Senators and several House members. The Interior Department had advocated for in concept or worked with Members of Congress on many of the individual provisions that made up the package.

Secretarial Order 3374, Implementation of the John D. Dingell, Jr. Conservation, Management, and Recreation Act establishes a task force to ensure the timely and coordinated implementation of the Dingell Act and consistency among all offices and Bureaus within the Department of the Interior.

Five Fun Ways to Celebrate National Park Week

nps logoWASHINGTON – Ring in spring with a visit to a national park during National Park Week, April 15 through 23. Throughout the country, hundreds of programs and events will encourage visitors to explore new places and enjoy new experiences. More information is available at www.nationalparkweek.org.

"Our National Parks are our national treasure," said Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke. "My formative years were spent in Glacier National Park and one of my biggest mentors was a park ranger and football coach. The lessons you learn from the land and the park rangers cannot be learned anywhere else on earth. As we head into the next 100 years of the Park Service, I'm looking at ways to improve infrastructure and visitor experience while conserving the precious lands for generations to come."

“There are 417 national parks and each one has a story to tell,” said Acting National Park Service Director Michael F. Reynolds. “There are endless options during National Park Week to discover someplace or something out of the ordinary. Whether one seeks relaxation, exhilaration, or inspiration, there is something for everyone in a national park.”

Five Fun Ways to Celebrate National Park Week

nps logoWASHINGTON – Ring in spring with a visit to a national park during National Park Week, April 15 through 23. Throughout the country, hundreds of programs and events will encourage visitors to explore new places and enjoy new experiences. More information is available at www.nationalparkweek.org.

"Our National Parks are our national treasure," said Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke. "My formative years were spent in Glacier National Park and one of my biggest mentors was a park ranger and football coach. The lessons you learn from the land and the park rangers cannot be learned anywhere else on earth. As we head into the next 100 years of the Park Service, I'm looking at ways to improve infrastructure and visitor experience while conserving the precious lands for generations to come."

“There are 417 national parks and each one has a story to tell,” said Acting National Park Service Director Michael F. Reynolds. “There are endless options during National Park Week to discover someplace or something out of the ordinary. Whether one seeks relaxation, exhilaration, or inspiration, there is something for everyone in a national park.”


Following are just five of the fun ways you can celebrate National Park Week.

Try Something New

Introductory programs during National Park Week might just get you hooked on a new interest. Brush up on astronomy at a Night Sky Party in Saguaro National Park, go birding at Fort McHenry National Monument and Historic Shrine, take a photo workshop at Cumberland Gap National Historical Park, make pottery at Ocmulgee National Monument, dance to Cajun music at Jean Lafitte National Historical Park and Preserve, or try your hand at surf fishing at Gateway National Recreation Area.

Save Some Money

There will be free entrance to all national parks during the weekends of National Park Week. The 118 National Park Service sites that normally charge entrance fees will offer free admission on April 15, 16, 22, and 23. There are also free or reduced rate annual passes available for active duty military families, fourth grade students, senior citizens, volunteers, and people with permanent disabilities.

Become a Junior Ranger

National Park Week starts with National Junior Ranger Day on April 15. Throughout the country, kids of all ages can take part in family friendly events and earn a park-specific Junior Ranger badge. Children can see a bald eagle up close at Mississippi National River and Recreation Area, participate in crafts at Lowell National Historical Park, go on an archeology dig at Chiricahua National Monument, or test their global positioning system (GPS) skills in Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park.

Fill a Park Prescription

The second annual Park Prescription Day will be filled with activities that showcase the physical, mental, and psychological health benefits of time in nature. Supported by increasing scientific evidence, many medical doctors now write prescriptions for the outdoors as an antidote for ailments such as diabetes, high blood pressure, and depression. On April 23, dozens of parks, including Golden Gate National Recreation Area, Shenandoah National Park, Capulin Volcano National Monument, Tumacácori National Historical Park, Prince William Forest Park, Hot Springs National Park, and park partners will host activities that include hikes, health screenings, yoga, and volleyball.

Go Wild on Earth Day

Spend some time outside on Earth Day, April 22. Attend a wildlife festival on the Natchez Trace Parkway, go for a walk on the wild side at Cabrillo National Monument, learn to canoe on the Niobrara National Scenic River, make an appearance at a drama festival at Chamizal National Memorial, listen to a concert at Buffalo National River, weave a pine needle basket at Fort Matanzas National Monument, or meet a Civil War soldier at Stones River National Battlefield.

Visit www.nps.gov to plan your park visit. The site contains trip planning information and a calendar of events. Use #FindYourPark, #EncuentraTuParque and #NPS101 on social media during National Park Week to join in the fun!

Governors seek DOI consultation

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Western Governors have asked Department of the Interior (DOI) Secretary Ryan Zinke why they were not consulted in advance about DOI's proposal to change the bureaus’ regional office boundaries and shared additional questions regarding the proposal.

"Western Governors appreciate your desire to improve the efficiency of DOI so that it can more effectively respond to the needs of our nation," said WGA Chair and South Dakota Gov. Dennis Daugaard and Vice Chair and Hawaii Gov. David Igein the letter sent Feb. 1. However, the Governors

In Case You Missed It: Energy Security is National Security

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Published by: The Washington Times By: Interior Secretary David L. Bernhardt

Just as energy independence is fundamental to our nation’s security, reducing our dependence upon foreign countries for critical minerals is vital to our nation’s long-term interests. Prior to the Trump Administration, the policies coming out of Washington were marginalizing the energy, manufacturing and mining industries and, as a result, ultimately diminishing our country’s security. Those days are over.

Maine receives first designated National Monument

Katahdin Woods & Waters National Monument Permanently Protects Mountains, Forests & Waters of North-Central Maine, Builds on Robust Tradition of Growing National Park System through Private Philanthropy 

WASHINGTON – On the eve of the 100th anniversary of the National Park Service, U.S. Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell and National Park Service Director Jonathan B. Jarvis today applauded President Obama’s designation of the Katahdin Woods and Waters National Monument, the first national monument to preserve the landscape and honor the history and culture of Maine’s North Woods. The President’s use of the Antiquities Act to make this designation permanently protects 87,500 acres of lands donated to the National Park Service earlier this week by the Elliottsville Plantation, Inc., (EPI), including the East Branch of the Penobscot River and its tributaries, one of the most pristine watersheds in the Northeast.

National Survey of Critical Minerals Ordered

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Department of Interior

Secretary Zinke Signs Order to Begin Process of Creating First Ever National Survey of Critical Minerals

WASHINGTON, D.C. – Today, following President Donald J. Trump's executive order to break America's dependence on foreign minerals, U.S. Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke signed a secretarial order directing the initial steps to producing the first nationwide geological and topographical survey of the United States in modern history. The order also directs Interior bureaus to begin work on identifying immediate domestic sources for critical minerals.

Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument Expanded

doi logoSecretaries Intend to Recognize Hawaii Office of Hawaiian Affairs as Additional Co-Trustee in Management of World’s Largest Marine Protected Area

WASHINGTON – U.S. Secretary of Commerce Penny Pritzker and U.S. Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell today applauded President Obama’s action to use his executive authority under the Antiquities Act and expand the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument – making it the largest marine protected area on Earth.

The Northwestern Hawaiian Islands were originally protected by President Teddy Roosevelt who established the Hawaiian Islands Bird Reservation in 1909. President Franklin D. Roosevelt broadened the protections to all wildlife and formed the Hawaiian Islands National Wildlife Refuge in 1940. And in 2006 President George W. Bush created Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument to protect and preserve the marine waters and their wildlife and historic, cultural and scientific riches. Today’s designation will expand the existing Marine National Monument by 442,781 square miles, bringing the total protected area to 582,578 square miles.

President Trump Requests $11.6 Billion for Interior Department’s FY 2018 Budget

doi logoBudget Blueprint Furthers the Administration’s Strong Support for Responsible Energy Development on Federal Lands, Protects and Conserves America’s Public Lands, and Fulfills DOI’s Trust Responsibilities

WASHINGTON - U.S. Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke today announced President Trump’s $11.6 billion Fiscal Year (FY) 2018 budget blueprint request for the Department of the Interior. The budget meets the Department's core mission while also saving taxpayers $1.5 billion or 12 percent reduction from the FY 2017 Annualized Continuing Resolution level.
 

Proposed Joint Fossil Regulation Announced for Interior Department’s Managed Lands

doi logoCollaborative rule clarifies and coordinates paleontological resource management and preservation in areas managed by Bureau of Land Management, Bureau of Reclamation, Fish and Wildlife Service, and National Park Service
 
WASHINGTON – The U.S. Department of the Interior today announced a proposed rule to further facilitate implementation of the Paleontological Resources Preservation Act of 2009. The proposed rule provides standards for a coordinated approach to the management of paleontological resources on lands managed by four DOI Bureaus: Bureau of Land Management (BLM), Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation), Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS), and National Park Service (NPS). It will also clarify how these bureaus manage paleontological resources to ensure they are available for current and future generations to enjoy as part of America’s national heritage.

Secretary Bernhardt Announces $10.7 Million in Public-Private Support for Big Game Migration Corridors

Partnership between DOI, NFWF, and ConocoPhillips benefits elk, mule deer and pronghorn in 6 Western states

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WASHINGTON – Today, U.S. Secretary of the Interior David Bernhardt announced the award of $2.1 million in grants to state and local partners in Colorado, Montana, Nevada, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming for habitat conservation activities in migration corridors and winter range for elk, mule deer, and pronghorn. The targeted big game species will benefit from the conservation actions funded by these grants as will a wide array of plant and other wildlife species.

Through a public-private partnership between the Department of the Interior (DOI), the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation (NFWF), and ConocoPhillips, the grants are expected to leverage more than $8.6 million in matching contributions, generating a total conservation impact of more than $10.7 million. The announcement comes as Secretarial Order 3362 is implemented to improve the habitat conditions in big game migration corridors and winter range areas.

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