Dismissed: HSUS Lawsuit to Silence Maine’s Wildlife Professionals

U.S. Sportsmen's AllianceOn Friday, April 3, 2015 Maine Superior Court Justice Joyce Wheeler issued a final judgment in the question of the state’s ability to comment on wildlife issues. In her ruling, Wheeler sided with the U.S. Sportsmen's Alliance and fully dismissed a lawsuit aimed at silencing Maine’s wildlife professionals.

The case started in the closing weeks of the Maine bear campaign over Question 1 on last November’s ballot. The Humane Society of the United States (HSUS), through their front group Mainers for Fair Bear Hunting, sued the state of Maine alleging an improper level of engagement in the. The “state,” in this case, was the Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife, whose vocal and public opposition to Question 1 didn't mesh with HSUS’ wish to stop bear hunting in the state.

Game and Fish helps pronghorn cross boundaries

Copter antelopeGPS collars provide data to improve connectivity  

FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. (Dec. 23, 2015) Like some giant bird of prey, the helicopter appeared from seemingly out of nowhere and swooped down on the unsuspecting herd of pronghorn feeding on the open grassland below.

The chase was on.

In the end, despite being able to reach speeds up to 60 mph, the fastest animal in North America was no match. The net-gunner’s aim was true, the handler or “mugger” placed a GPS collar around the pronghorn’s neck, and within moments the animal was safely removed from the net and turned loose to rejoin its herd.

Higher than Usual Bird and Marine Mammal Strandings along Southern California Beaches

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Federal and State Wildlife Officials Monitor Higher than Usual Bird and Marine Mammal Strandings along Southern California Beaches

How the Public Can Report Stranded Birds and Marine Mammals

April 21, 2017 - Wildlife officials and members of the public have seen higher than usual numbers of stranded or dead marine mammals and birds along southern California beaches in recent weeks. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, California Department of Fish and Wildlife, and the USGS National Wildlife Health Center are working together to document the size and scope of affected wildlife and mortalities. Stranding reports have included loons, grebes, cormorants, California brown pelicans, and California sea lions.  Many loons are currently migrating through the Santa Barbara Channel on their spring migration northward. 

Latest round of testing finds CWD in new hunt areas

CHEYENNE - The latest round of tests from the Wyoming Game and Fish Department’s chronic wasting disease (CWD) surveillance program has found the disease in three new hunt areas. CWD is a fatal neurological disease of deer, elk and moose. The National Park Service also recently found CWD at Devils Tower National Monument.

Staff at the Wyoming Game and Fish Department’s wildlife disease laboratory in Laramie confirmed the presence of CWD in a bull elk from elk hunt area 12 northeast of Saratoga, in a white-tailed buck from deer hunt area 112 southwest of Cody and a white-tailed doe in deer hunt area 171 north of Lander. Consistent with previous CWD findings for the season, these hunt areas are all near or overlap areas where CWD has been detected before. As is the case with Park Service’s finding, which corresponds with deer hunt area 1.

Secretary Bernhardt Announces $10.7 Million in Public-Private Support for Big Game Migration Corridors

Partnership between DOI, NFWF, and ConocoPhillips benefits elk, mule deer and pronghorn in 6 Western states

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WASHINGTON – Today, U.S. Secretary of the Interior David Bernhardt announced the award of $2.1 million in grants to state and local partners in Colorado, Montana, Nevada, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming for habitat conservation activities in migration corridors and winter range for elk, mule deer, and pronghorn. The targeted big game species will benefit from the conservation actions funded by these grants as will a wide array of plant and other wildlife species.

Through a public-private partnership between the Department of the Interior (DOI), the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation (NFWF), and ConocoPhillips, the grants are expected to leverage more than $8.6 million in matching contributions, generating a total conservation impact of more than $10.7 million. The announcement comes as Secretarial Order 3362 is implemented to improve the habitat conditions in big game migration corridors and winter range areas.

State Works to Reduce Traffic Collisions with Wildlife

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Mule deer use an overpass with fencing created to direct
them over the road safely. (Nevada Department of Wildlife)

CARSON CITY, Nev. — Animals in the road cause an average of 500 traffic collisions a year in Nevada - which is why experts on wildlife, transportation and development are meeting for a summit today at the Governor's Mansion in Carson City. 

Each year, those collisions kill one or two people and cost taxpayers between $19 million and $22 million. Brian Wakeling, administrator for the game division of the Nevada Department of Wildlife, said underpasses and overpasses built to allow safe wildlife crossings make a huge difference for species such as elk, mule deer, wild horses, bighorn sheep, bears and the desert tortoise.

Super Bird Fests 2017

usfws logoA Calendar of Great Festivals on or near National Wildlife Refuges

Looking for a special bird to add to your life list? Brand new to birding and just thrill to the sight of thousands of migrating birds?  Either way, bird festivals beckon you to national wildlife refuges throughout the year and from coast to coast.

National wildlife refuges often are festival sites because so many are located along the country’s key migratory bird routes. Many festivals coincide with spring or fall migration. Here are some great refuge bird festivals to catch in 2017.

The National Wildlife Refuge System, part of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, protects natural habitat for America’s treasured wildlife species. 

USDA and DoD Battle to conserve

usda mastheadInterior, Agriculture & Defense Team Up To Conserve Landscapes and Wildlife, Bolster Rural Economies, and Ensure Military Readiness

WASHINGTON – The Departments of Interior, Agriculture and Defense joined with state and federal partners today to announce the designation of three new Sentinel Landscapes to benefit working lands, wildlife conservation and military readiness. Through the Sentinel Landscapes partnership, the DOI, USDA and DoD have committed to working together in overlapping priority areas near military installations to help farmers and ranchers make improvements to the land that benefit their operation, enhance wildlife habitat, and enable DoD's training missions to continue. This year’s Sentinel Landscapes were chosen for Avon Park Air Force Range in Florida, Camp Ripley in Minnesota and military bases in Eastern North Carolina.

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